Fall books preview: literature, language, & classics

Fall 2015 very largeWe’re excited about the books we’ll be publishing this fall—and pleased to share this series of “Fall Books Preview” blog posts! Be sure to check out the online edition of JHUP’s entire Fall 2015 catalog, and remember that promo code “HDPD” gets you a 30% discount on pre-pub orders. Here are some of our forthcoming books in literature and classics:


bricuthPure Products of America, Inc.
A Narrative Poem
John Bricuth

This propulsive narrative poem tells the extended story of the popular born-again televangelist Ray Bob Elray—better known to all his fans as Big Bubba—his twin sons, Nick and Jesse, and his niece and adopted daughter, Donna.

“The outrageous John Bricuth has surpassed himself in this sublimely mad narrative poem about our ongoing America. There is no one quite like Bricuth. He tries to play all the notes at once and frequently succeeds. Wickedness, supernal wit, eloquence always just off the beat, and a fierce verve animate this unsettling leap into our deepening abyss. To read this poem is to imbibe a tonic for these darkening times.”—Harold Bloom

“In his hugely enjoyable new verse novel, John Bricuth recounts the rise and fall of Big Bubba, preacher, faith healer, and entrepreneur, ‘the Donald Trump of holy rollers,’ whose long-kept secret has torn his family apart. It’s a captivating story, a real page-turner, poignant yet often hilarious, told in high-energy language by a master poet.”—X. J. Kennedy

Available in November


loudenPennsylvania Dutch: The Story of an American Language
Mark L. Louden

In this probing study, Mark L. Louden, himself a fluent speaker of Pennsylvania Dutch, provides readers with a close look at the place of the language in the life and culture of two major subgroups of speakers: the “Fancy Dutch,” whose ancestors were affiliated mainly with Lutheran and German Reformed churches, and conservative Anabaptist sectarians known as the “Plain people”—the Old Order Amish and Mennonites.

“Mark L. Louden is the foremost scholar of Pennsylvania Dutch. A significant contribution to linguistic, sociolinguistic, historical, and anthropological scholarship, his book is extensively researched, accessible, and filled with a wealth of language examples that will appeal to a wide audience.”—Karen Johnson-Weiner, SUNY Potsdam, coauthor of The Amish

Available in January 2106


duvallNarrating 9/11: Fantasies of State, Security, and Terrorism
edited by John N. Duvall and Robert P. Marzec

Narrating 9/11 challenges the notion that Americans have overcome the national trauma of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The volume responds to issues of war, surveillance, and the expanding security state, including the Bush Administration’s policies on preemptive war, extraordinary rendition, torture abroad, and the suspension of privacy rights and civil liberties at home.

Touching on some of the mainstays of 9/11 fiction, including Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close and John Updike’s Terrorist, the book expands this particular canon by considering the work of such writers as Jess Walter, William Gibson, Lauren Groff, Ken Kalfus, Ian McEwan, Philip Roth, John le Carré, Laila Halaby, Michael Chabon, and Jarett Kobek. Narrating 9/11 pushes beyond a critical focus on domestic realism, offering chapters that examine speculative and genre fiction, postmodernism, climate change, and the evolving security state, as well as the television series Lost and the film Paradise Now.

Available in September


fabreWomen and War in Antiquity
edited by Jacqueline Fabre-Serris and Alison Keith

The martial virtues—courage, loyalty, cunning, and strength—were central to male identity in the ancient world, and antique literature is replete with depictions of men cultivating and exercising these virtues on the battlefield. In Women and War in Antiquity, sixteen scholars reexamine classical sources to uncover the complex but hitherto unexplored relationship between women and war in ancient Greece and Rome. They reveal that women played a much more active role in battle than previously assumed, embodying martial virtues in both real and mythological combat.

“A fascinating, intellectually stimulating, and useful volume, Women and War in Antiquity sheds important new light on a complex issue while offering penetrating interpretations at the intersection of history and literature. This excellent book should interest scholars far beyond those specializing in Greco-Roman culture.”—Kurt Raaflaub, Brown University, coeditor of Raymond Westbrook’s Ex Oriente Lex: Near Eastern Influences on Ancient Greek and Roman Law

Available in November


michaelBritish Romanticism and the Critique of Political Reason
Timothy Michael

What role should reason play in the creation of a free and just society? Can we claim to know anything in a field as complex as politics? And how can the cause of political rationalism be advanced when it is seen as having blood on its hands? These are the questions that occupied a group of British poets, philosophers, and polemicists in the years following the French Revolution. Timothy Michael argues that much literature of the period is a trial, or a critique, of reason in its political capacities and a test of the kinds of knowledge available to it. This book bridges for the first time two traditional pillars of Romantic studies: the period’s politics and its theories of the mind and knowledge. Combining literary and intellectual history, it provides an account of British Romanticism in which high rhetoric, political prose, poetry, and poetics converge in a discourse of enlightenment and emancipation.

“Ambitious, well executed, and timely, this book provides valuable insight into some of the most abiding questions of Romantic studies.”—Charles W. Mahoney, University of Connecticut, editor of A Companion to Romantic Poetry

Available in December

 


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Filed under Ancient, Classics, Literature, Poetry, Poetry, Publishing News

Fall books preview: history

Fall 2015 very largeWe’re excited about the books we’ll be publishing this fall—and pleased to share this series of “Fall Books Preview” blog posts! Be sure to check out the online edition of JHUP’s entire Fall 2015 catalog, and remember that promo code “HDPD” gets you a 30% discount on pre-pub orders. We continue of our preview posts today with forthcoming books in history:


pettigrewLight It Up: The Marine Eye for Battle in the War for Iraq
John Pettegrew

Light It Up examines the visual culture of the early twenty-first century. Focusing on the Marine Corps, which played a critical part in the invasion and occupation of Iraq, John Pettegrew argues that U.S. military force in the Iraq War was projected through an “optics of combat.” Powerful military technology developed in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars has placed war in a new posthuman era.

“A bold, complex, wonderfully written book with a revolutionary thesis: that technologies of seeing and the outlook of marines combine to form a ‘projection of force’ beyond the traditional meaning of the concept. Provocative and original.”—William Thomas Allison, Georgia Southern University, author of My Lai: An American Atrocity in the Vietnam War

Available in October


dowdGroundless: Rumors, Legends, and Hoaxes on the Early American Frontier
Gregory Evans Dowd

Rumor—spread by colonists and Native Americans alike—ran rampant in early America. In Groundless, historian Gregory Evans Dowd explores why half-truths, deliberate lies, and outrageous legends emerged in the first place, how they grew, and why they were given such credence throughout the New World. Arguing that rumors are part of the objective reality left to us by the past—a kind of fragmentary archival record—he examines how uncertain news became powerful enough to cascade through the centuries.

“Skillfully written, informative, and stimulating. More than just a collection of rumors and the stories they generated, this book is a smart exploration of the issue of hearsay and the limitations in the evidence historians depend upon to craft their narratives.”—Colin G. Calloway, Dartmouth College, author of New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remaking of Early America

Available in January 2016


traversHodges’ Scout: A Lost Patrol of the French and Indian War
Len Travers

Pieced together from archival records, period correspondence, and official reports, Hodges’ Scout relates the riveting tale of young colonists who were tragically caught up in a war they barely understood. Len Travers brings history to life by describing the variety of motives that led men to enlist in the campaign and the methods and means they used to do battle. He also reveals what the soldiers wore, the illnesses they experienced, the terror and confusion of combat, and the bitter hardships of captivity in alien lands. His remarkable research brings human experiences alive, giving us a rare, full-color view of the French and Indian War—the first true world war.

“Fascinating, vivid, and highly informed. Travers is a master of foreshadowing and verisimilitude. This is the social history of war at its best.”—Gregory Evans Dowd, University of Michigan, author of War under Heaven: Pontiac, the Indian Nations, and the British Empire

Available in December


reinbergerThe Philadelphia Country House: Architecture and Landscape in Colonial America
Mark Reinberger and Elizabeth McLean

In this masterly volume, Mark Reinberger, a senior architectural historian, and Elizabeth McLean, an accomplished scholar of landscape history, examine the country houses that the urban gentry built on the outskirts of Philadelphia in response to both local and international economic forces, social imperatives, and fashion. The Philadelphia Country House explores the myriad ways in which these estates—which were located in the country but responded to the ideas and manners of the city—straddled the cultural divide between urban and rural. Illustrated with nearly 150 photographs, more than 60 line drawings, and two color galleries.

“Reinberger and McLean have succeeded in illuminating the nature and significance of a specific building type in colonial America, the country house or seat, focusing on those around the city of Philadelphia. The scholarship is extremely sound, the documentation is profuse, and the book effectively presents a tremendous amount of information on a significant topic that deserves elucidation. No comparable study exists.”—Damie Stillman, University of Delaware Professor Emeritus

Available in October


mcmanusHell Before Their Very Eyes: American Soldiers Liberate Concentration Camps in Germany, April 1945
John C. McManus

On April 4, 1945, United States Army units from the 89th Infantry Division and the 4th Armored Division seized Ohrdruf, the first of many Nazi concentration camps to be liberated in Germany. In the weeks that followed, as more camps were discovered, thousands of soldiers came face to face with the monstrous reality of Hitler’s Germany.

Military historian John C. McManus sheds new light on this often-overlooked aspect of the Holocaust. Drawing on a rich blend of archival sources and thousands of firsthand accounts—including unit journals, interviews, oral histories, memoirs, diaries, letters, and published recollections—Hell Before Their Very Eyes focuses on the experiences of the soldiers who liberated Ohrdruf, Buchenwald, and Dachau and their determination to bear witness to this horrific history.

“This is a history that demands to be published. The use of personal witness accounts is the only way to capture the essence of the traumatic experience the American soldiers had to deal with.”—Daniel D. Holt, editor of Eisenhower: The Prewar Diaries and Selected Papers, 1905−1941

Available in November


condonShays’s Rebellion: Authority and Distress in Post-Revolutionary America
Sean Condon

In this concise and compelling account of the uprising that came to be known as Shays’s Rebellion, Sean Condon describes the economic difficulties facing both private citizens and public officials in newly independent Massachusetts. He explains the state government policy that precipitated the farmers’ revolt, details the machinery of tax and debt collection in the 1780s, and provides readers with a vivid example of how the establishment of a republican form of government shifted the boundaries of dissent and organized protest.

“The deepest account of the rebellion I have read, the book keeps a strong narrative line and grows in drama as it proceeds. Undergraduates should cherish this work. Riveting.”—Barry Levy, University of Massachusetts–Amherst, author of Town Born: The Political Economy of New England from Its Founding to the Revolution

Available in July


josephsonFish Sticks, Sports Bras, and Aluminum Cans: The Politics of Everyday Technologies
Paul R. Josephson

In Fish Sticks, Sports Bras, and Aluminum Cans, historian Paul R. Josephson explores the surprising origins, political contexts, and social meanings of ordinary objects. Drawing on archival materials, technical journals, interviews, and field research, this engaging collection of essays reveals the forces that shape (and are shaped by) everyday objects. Ultimately, Josephson suggests that the most familiar and comfortable objects—sugar and aluminum, for example, which are inextricably tied together by their linked history of slavery and colonialism—may have the more astounding and troubling origins

“Josephson draws readers into the complexities and fascinations of the study of technological history. A lively and provocative book.”—David E. Nye, University of Southern Denmark, author of Technology Matters: Questions to Live With

Available in November

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Filed under American History, American Studies, History, History of technology, Popular Culture, Publishing News, War and Conflict

Enough is enough: Fisher v. University of Texas

How many bites does Abigail Fisher get at this apple? Fisher was an applicant who sued the University of Texas at Austin in 2008 after she was denied admission both on the automatic admissions policy (the Percentage Plan) and by the holistic review process. She claimed her denial was due to her being white. In 2013, the Supreme Court held that the Fifth Circuit had erred when it did not apply “strict scrutiny” in its review. Upon remand, in July 2014, a three-judge panel of the Circuit carefully reviewed and upheld (2 to 1) the University’s policies. Fisher’s appeal of that ruling has been granted cert and will be heard again by the Court.

Michael A. Olivas

Michael A. Olivas

Fisher was not eligible for the Percentage Plan because she was not a good enough high school student to qualify. She was not admitted through the second review accorded many UT-Austin applicants. She has lost at each turn, somehow seeking extra opportunities to prove she was denied admission because of her race. Now, the Supreme Court has decided to accept and encourage yet another attempt at the prize, even though she graduated from another college and is not eligible as the full-time first-time freshman she would have been had her record been better.

In short, UT-Austin cannot be the only college in the country to which Grutter v. Bollinger (the 2003 case which allowed the use of affirmative action in a modest fashion, subject to state laws and institutional policies) does not apply. They have been both fair and transparent, and Fisher has not squarely challenged the Percentage Plan. But UT’s use of this race neutral plan—mandated by state law—does not mean she should be allowed to challenge a lawful affirmative action plan. SCOTUS cannot keep sending out mixed signals about the viability of an admissions process that was found to be constitutional. And when the conservative Fifth Circuit has determined the plan upon remand was constitutional, that should be the end of it.

If the news that the former UT-Austin president exercised political judgments in some admissions has caused the Court pause, they had better steel themselves for dozens of such cases, given the widespread use of such discretionary admissions. And in Texas, I think I am likely correct when I guess that the overwhelming number of such requests and decisions were on behalf of Anglo students.

One of the last bastions of white supremacy is undeserving plaintiffs challenging laws that they think disadvantage them. Even under the race-neutral Percentage Plan, which I helped draft, whites constitute more than half the recipients in a state where white high school graduates are only 30% of the total. Where is the unfairness? She and her legal team should quit wasting the Court’s time, and the Court should stop encouraging rear guard actions such as Fisher’s. Such a challenge is waving a confederate flag long after it should have been retired.

olivasMichael A. Olivas is the William B. Bates Distinguished Chair of Law at the University of Houston and the director of the Institute for Higher Education Law and Governance. His most recent book, Suing Alma Mater: Higher Education and the Courts, was published by Johns Hopkins. It was chosen as the 2014 winner of the Steven S. Goldberg Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Education Law, given annually by the Education Law Association “in recognition of an outstanding article, book, book chapter, or other form of scholarly legal writing in the field of education law.” 

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Filed under Affirmative Action, Higher Education, Supreme Court

Fall books preview: politics, behavior, & public health

Fall 2015 very largeWe’re excited about the books we’ll be publishing this fall—and pleased to share this series of “Fall Books Preview” blog posts! Be sure to check out the online edition of JHUP’s entire Fall 2015 catalog, and remember that promo code “HDPD” gets you a 30% discount on pre-pub orders. Today we continue with a selection of our forthcoming books in politics, behavior, and public health:


formisano15Plutocracy in America: How Increasing Inequality Destroys the Middle Class and Exploits the Poor
Ronald P. Formisano

Ronald P. Formisano surveys the widening circle of inequality’s effects, the exploitation of the poor and the middle class, and the new ways that predators take money out of Americans’ pockets while passive federal and state governments stand by. This data-driven book offers insight into the fallacy of widespread opportunity, the fate of the middle class, and the mechanisms that perpetuate income disparity.

“An accessible overview of recent trends in economic inequality. Formisano has a gift for presenting abstract information in compelling, even gripping, terms.”—Angus Burgin, Johns Hopkins University, author of The Great Persuasion: Reinventing Free Markets since the Depression

Available in September


perryKiller Apes, Naked Apes, and Just Plain Nasty People: The Misuse and Abuse of Science in Political Discourse
Richard J. Perry

We like to think that science always illuminates. But the disturbing persistence of the concept of biological determinism—the false idea that human behavior is genetically fixed or inherently programmed and therefore is not susceptible to rapid change—shows that scientific research and concepts can be distorted to advance an inhumane and sometimes deadly political agenda. Anthropologist Richard J. Perry delivers a scathing critique of determinism. Exploring the historical context and enduring popularity of the movement over the past century and a half, he debunks the facile and the reductionist thinking of so many popularizers of biological determinism while considering why biological explanations have resonated in ways that serve to justify deeply conservative points of view.

“I read Richard Perry’s thought-provoking book in a single sitting. Written in a lively, engaging style, the book takes evolutionary psychology to task in a perceptive and penetrating fashion.”—Paul Farber, Oregon State University, author of Mixing Races: From Scientific Racism to Modern Evolutionary Ideas

Available in September


barrIntroduction to Biosocial Medicine: The Social, Psychological, and Biological Determinants of Human Behavior and Well-Being
Donald A. Barr, MD, PhD

While 40 percent of premature deaths in the United States can be attributed to such dangerous behaviors as smoking, overeating, inactivity, and drug or alcohol use, medical education has generally failed to address how these behaviors are influenced by social forces. This new textbook from Dr. Donald A. Barr was designed in response to the growing recognition that physicians need to understand the biosocial sciences behind human behavior in order to be effective practitioners. Introduction to Biosocial Medicine explains the determinants of human behavior and the overwhelming impact of behavior on health.

“A compelling, clearly written, and original review of how social factors influence well-being, this timely and accessible book will greatly benefit students who intend to pursue further study in medicine.”—Mark J. Graham, Yale School of Medicine

 Available in January 2016


diamond15Democracy in Decline?
edited by Larry Diamond and Marc F. Plattner. essays by Francis Fukuyama, Robert Kagan, Larry Diamond, Thomas Carothers, Marc F. Plattner, Philippe C. Schmitter, Steven Levitsky, and Lucan Way
foreword by Condoleezza Rice

For almost a decade, Freedom House’s annual survey has highlighted a decline in democracy in most regions of the globe. While some analysts draw upon this evidence to argue that the world has entered a “democratic recession,” others dispute that interpretation, emphasizing instead democracy’s success in maintaining the huge gains it made during the last quarter of the twentieth century. Discussion of this question has moved beyond disputes about how many countries should be classified as democratic to embrace a host of wider concerns about the health of democracy: the poor economic and political performance of advanced democracies, the new self-confidence and assertiveness of a number of leading authoritarian countries, and a geopolitical weakening of democracies relative to these resurgent authoritarians.

“This book provides impressive insights on how political leaders helped their countries navigate from dictatorships toward democracy. A must-read for future transitions.”—Michelle Bachelet, President of Chile

Available in October


wuForging Trust Communities: How Technology Changes Politics
Irene S. Wu

Irene S. Wu’s Forging Trust Communities argues that the Internet, and the technologies that predate it, catalyze political change by creating new opportunities for cooperation. The Internet does not simply enable faster and easier communication, but makes it possible for people around the world to interact closely, reciprocate favors, and build trust. The information and ideas exchanged by members of these cooperative communities become key sources of political power akin to military might and economic strength.

“Accessible and engaging, Wu’s book merges the practical with the scholarly to embed the current, Internet-led information revolution’s effects on collective action and governance within a historical perspective, weaving together a wealth of diverse and expansive cases.”—Catie Snow Bailard, George Washington University, author of Democracy’s Double-Edged Sword: How Internet Use Changes Citizens’ Views of Their Government

Available in July


reshRethinking the Administrative Presidency: Trust, Intellectual Capital, and Appointee-Careerist Relations in the George W. Bush Administration
William G. Resh

Why do presidents face so many seemingly avoidable bureaucratic conflicts? And why do these clashes usually intensify toward the end of presidential administrations, when a commander-in-chief’s administrative goals tend to be more explicit and better aligned with their appointed leadership’s prerogatives? In Rethinking the Administrative Presidency, William G. Resh considers these complicated questions from an empirical perspective.

“In this theoretically and empirically sophisticated book, Bill Resh makes important contributions to our understanding of the role of political appointees in advancing presidential policy agendas. His analysis demonstrates that political appointees who approach the career services with distrust will find distrust mirrored back to them.”—James P. Pfiffner, George Mason University, author of The Managerial Presidency

Available in December


bitarDemocratic Transitions: Conversations with World Leaders
edited by Sergio Bitar and Abraham F. Lowenthal

National leaders who played key roles in transitions to democratic governance reveal how these were accomplished in Brazil, Chile, Ghana, Indonesia, Mexico, the Philippines, Poland, South Africa, and Spain. Commissioned by the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (International IDEA), these interviews shed fascinating light on how repressive regimes were ended and democracy took hold.

The book includes probing conversations with Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Patricio Aylwin, Ricardo Lagos, John Kufuor, Jerry Rawlings, B. J. Habibie, Ernesto Zedillo, Fidel V. Ramos, Aleksander Kwaśniewski, Tadeusz Mazowiecki, F. W. de Klerk, Thabo Mbeki, and Felipe González.

Available in September

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SCOTUS, same-sex marriage, and Christian colleges

Guest post by Michael A. Olivas

Conservative religious groups have shown concern over the Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, a case that has resolved the question of whether the U.S. Constitution establishes a right to same-sex marriage.  They fear that their current practices and student codes might run afoul of the public policy theory from Bob Jones University v. United States, and that the Internal Revenue Service will disallow their tax exemptions. If this did occur, then the colleges would have a genuine test of their core principles, and if they do not comport with the “public policy” requirement for tax exemption, they should render unto Caesar or surrender the public largesse that arises from tax exempt status.

MichaelOlivas1

Michael A. Olivas

The sky is not falling, and just as segregated schools have learned to live with students of color when they banned them before Brown, and just like men’s public colleges have thrived with the admission of women, so will these colleges—whose beliefs were no less well established than those of the conservative Christian outliers—live with this new constitutional reality and public policy. Schools should not act as parents and censor their students’ personal choices, especially ones that are legal and have no bearing upon student fitness. There will be exceptions, depending upon the state and status of the school, where they can ban or regulate otherwise-legal behavior, such as drinking on campus or engaging in smoking in their rooms, but we will all find a way to cope with these core principles, maintain our appropriate standards, and educate our students. We should embrace the growing freedoms and opportunities.

I attended Catholic schools, colleges, and law school virtually all my life, and studied for eight years in Catholic seminaries. Yet I do not believe that religious colleges can be safe harbors against properties that are in accord with public policy and Constitutional protection. Indeed, they cannot have it both ways. Their most principled actions may be to surrender the oppressive yoke they feel robs them of their privilege, and surrender their tax exemption. They hold the true keys to their own principled way.

olivasMichael A. Olivas is the William B. Bates Distinguished Chair of Law at the University of Houston and the director of the Institute for Higher Education Law and Governance. His most recent book, Suing Alma Mater: Higher Education and the Courts, published by Johns Hopkins, was chosen as the 2014 winner of the Steven S. Goldberg Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Education Law.

 

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Fall books preview: health & medicine, part two

Fall 2015 very largeWe’re excited about the books we’ll be publishing this fall—and pleased to share this series of “Fall Books Preview” blog posts! Be sure to check out the online edition of JHUP’s entire Fall 2015 catalog, and remember that promo code “HDPD” gets you a 30% discount on pre-pub orders. Today we continue with our forthcoming books in health and medicine, including several new editions in our award-winning Johns Hopkins Press Health Book series:


mondimore15Adolescent Depression: A Guide for Parents
second edition
Francis Mark Mondimore, MD, and Patrick Kelly, MD

In Adolescent Depression, psychiatrists Francis Mark Mondimore, MD, and Patrick Kelly, MD, explain that serious depression in adolescents goes beyond “moodiness.” Depression is in fact an illness—one that can be effectively treated. Incorporating the latest research from the field, the authors describe the many forms of depression and the many symptoms of depression in young people—from sadness to irritability, self-harm, drug and alcohol abuse, and violent rages.

Praise for the first edition:

“I heartily recommend this book to parents and relatives of adolescents who have or may have mood disorders. It . . . helps parents to understand the complexities of the problem [and] is optimistic of the likelihood of improvement with correct diagnosis and treatment.”—Marcia Slomowitz, MD, Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

“An outstanding work that surpasses anything else I have read for parents on clinical depression and bipolar disorder in teenagers.”—Anthony J. Drobnick, MD

Available in December


adlerLiving with Lymphoma: A Patient’s Guide
second edition
Elizabeth M. Adler, PhD
foreword by W. Jeffrey Baker, MD
introduction by Michael R. Bishop, MD

Winner, American Medical Writers Association Medical Book Award

When neurobiologist Elizabeth M. Adler was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma almost twenty years ago, she learned everything she could about the disease, both to cope with the emotional stress of her diagnosis and to make the best possible decisions for her treatment. In Living with Lymphoma, she combines her scientific expertise and personal knowledge with a desire to help other people who have lymphoma manage this complex and often baffling disease.

Praise for the first edition:

“The most complete explanation of what goes on . . . I highly recommend it for patients, loved ones, and anyone who would like to understand what is lymphoma.”—Lymphoma Information Network

“The most comprehensive book I have seen on the subject, short of a medical text.”—Oncolink

Available in January 2016


silverBefore and After Cancer Treatment: Heal Faster, Better, Stronger
second edition
Julie K. Silver, MD

A twelve-year cancer survivor and oncology rehabilitation specialist, Dr. Julie K. Silver wrote After Cancer Treatment to help others recover from the exhaustion and physical devastation that often follow treatment. This new edition of the book, retitled Before and After Cancer Treatment, describes improved therapies, better delivery of care, holistic care options, and energetics. In covering the benefits of prehabilitation strategies, which improve physical and emotional strength before beginning therapy, the book adds another dimension to the experience of cancer treatment.

Praise for the first edition:

“Dr. Silver’s book encompasses not just emotional and physical healing but spiritual as well. Her credentials as a young mother and cancer survivor, in addition to being a physiatrist with a specialization in rehab medicine, make her work both authoritative and compassionate.”—Paula J. Anastasia, RN, MN, OCN, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles

“A diagnosis of cancer changes one’s life forever. After her diagnosis, Dr. Silver chose to continue healing—this time, healing herself. Her book is a gift to all cancer patients.”—Irene Pollin, MSW, author of Taking Charge and Medical Crisis Counseling

Available in November


bristowA Guide to Survivorship for Women Who Have Ovarian Cancer
second edition
edited by Robert E. Bristow, MD, MBA, FACOG, FACS, Terri L. Cornelison, MD, PhD, FACOG, and F. J. Montz, MD, KM, FACOG, FACS

This updated and expanded second edition offers a wealth of information to ease the physical and emotional suffering of women who have ovarian cancer. The expert authors include highly respected and experienced oncologists, gynecologic oncology nurse specialists, researchers, and ovarian cancer survivors. Throughout the book they emphasize the concepts of survivorship, or living life well in the face of daunting uncertainties, and self-determination: the right of each patient to be informed, involved, and in control of her care.

Praise for the first edition:

“This important book should be included in all consumer health collections, as well as purchased by women affected by the disease.”—Library Journal

“Because the authors all have years of clinical experience, they seem to understand what women worry about and care about, and they address these issues throughout the book.”—Canadian Women’s Health Network

Available in October


paulImmunity
William E. Paul, MD

Packed with illustrations, stories from Dr. William E. Paul’s distinguished career, and compelling narratives of scientific discovery, Immunity presents the three laws of the human immune system—universality, tolerance, and appropriateness—and explains how the system protects and harms us. From the tale of how smallpox was overcome to the lessons of the Ebola epidemic to the utility of vaccines and the hope that the immune system can be used to treat or prevent cancer, Dr. Paul argues that we must position ourselves to take advantage of cutting-edge technologies and promising new tools in immunological research, including big data and the microbiome.

“A treasure trove of information, this wonderful book should broadly appeal to anyone interested in human health and disease. There is no competing volume that covers such breadth of immunology at this personal level. A tour de force.”—Daniel M. Davis, University of Manchester, author of The Compatibility Gene: How Our Bodies Fight Disease, Attract Others, and Define Our Selves

“Dr. Paul has lived the modern history of basic and applied immunology. His warm, down-to-earth style and deep insight into biology lead the reader on a fascinating journey in understanding these diverse processes from the vantage point of a discovery scientist.”—Hyam Levitsky, MD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Available in November

 

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Filed under Cancer, Emotional Health, Health and Medicine, History of Medicine, History of science, Mental Health, Psychiatry and Psychology, Publishing News, Uncategorized, Women's Health

Fall books preview: health & medicine, part one

Fall 2015 very largeWe’re excited about the books we’ll be publishing this fall—and pleased to share this series of “Fall Books Preview” blog posts! Be sure to check out the online edition of JHUP’s entire Fall 2015 catalog, and remember that promo code “HDPD” gets you a 30% discount on pre-pub orders. Today we offer the first of two posts highlighting our forthcoming books in health and medicine:


millerFinding Your Emotional Balance: A Guide for Women
Merry Noel Miller, MD

Women are twice as likely as men to become depressed. While they seek help for mental disorders more often than men, they also seek to help others, trying to keep everyone happy while taking care of parents, spouses, and children. Sometimes, doing it all is doing too much. Dr. Merry Noel Miller offers women of all ages advice for coping with life’s challenges while increasing its joys. Drawing on her three decades of experience as a psychiatrist specializing in women’s mental health—as well as her own personal struggles with depression and grief—she explains the special vulnerabilities and strengths of women during adolescence, the childbearing years, menopause, and late in life.

“Miller combines clinical insights with her own personal experiences to provide a practical, well-written, and interesting guide for women. This is the only book of which I am aware that tackles the subject of psychiatric disorders and symptoms across the lifespan for a general audience. I will recommend it to my patients.”—Jennifer L. Payne, MD, Women’s Mood Disorders Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital

Available in December


callahanThe Science of Mom: A Research-Based Guide to Your Babys First Year
Alice Callahan, PhD

In this friendly guide through the science of infancy, Science of Mom blogger and PhD scientist Alice Callahan explains how non-scientist mothers can learn the difference between hype and evidence. Readers of Alice’s blog have come to trust her balanced approach, which explains the science that lies behind headlines. The Science of Mom is a fascinating, eye-opening, and extremely informative exploration of the topics that generate discussion and debate in the media and among parents. From breastfeeding to vaccines to sleep, Alice’s advice will help you make smart choices so that you can relax and enjoy your baby.

“Finally, someone has brought some science—and some sense—to the mommy wars. Should be required reading for all new (and old) parents.”—Emily Oster, Brown University, author of Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong—And What You Really Need to Know

“Alice Callahan has written a breakthrough book, combining the compassion, warmth, and angst of a mother with the measured reasoning of a scientist. She helps parents not only understand how science works, but how they can access that science to answer their questions. She’s found a way to access the scientist in all of us.”—Paul A. Offit, MD, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Available in August


raoThe Traumatized Brain: A Family Guide to Understanding Mood, Memory, and Behavior after Brain Injury
Vani Rao, MBBS, MD, and Sandeep Vaishnavi, MD, PhD
foreword by Peter V. Rabins, MD, MPH

In The Traumatized Brain, neuropsychiatrists Drs. Vani Rao and Sandeep Vaishnavi—experts in helping people heal after head trauma—explain how traumatic brain injury, whether mild, moderate, or severe, affects the brain. They advise readers on how emotional symptoms such as depression, anxiety, mania, and apathy can be treated; how behavioral symptoms such as psychosis, aggression, impulsivity, and sleep disturbances can be addressed; and how cognitive functions like attention, memory, executive functioning, and language can be improved. They also discuss headaches, seizures, vision problems, and other neurological symptoms of traumatic brain injury.

“This book will challenge and encourage the reader. Whether an interested lay person, a caretaker, a family member, or a professional in the medical, nursing, or social work fields, readers will find this pioneering book a useful guide to the complexities of traumatic brain injury.”—From the Foreword by Peter V. Rabins, MD, MPD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, coauthor of The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for Persons with Alzheimer Disease, Related Dementing Illnesses, and Memory Loss in Later Life

Available in November


prasadEnding Medical Reversal: Improving Outcomes, Saving Lives
Vinayak K. Prasad, MD, MPH, and Adam S. Cifu, MD

Medical reversal happens when doctors start using a medication, procedure, or diagnostic tool without a robust evidence base—and then stop using it when it is found not to help, or even to harm, patients. Drs. Prasad and Cifu narrate fascinating stories from every corner of medicine to explore why medical reversals occur, how they are harmful, and what can be done to avoid them.

“An outstanding, genre-defining work, this book will be read by students, educators, policymakers, scientists, scholars, medical skeptics, and health-care pundits alike.”—John Henning Schumann, MD, host of Public Radio Tulsa’s Medical Matters

“An important book that frames medical reversal in a compelling way. Readers will be drawn to this clearly written account.”—David S. Jones, MD, Harvard University, author of Broken Hearts: The Tangled History of Cardiac Care

Available in November


thuvulathHepatitis C: A Complete Guide for Patients and Families
Paul J. Thuluvath, MD, FRCP

This book is a comprehensive guide to hepatitis C, which affects about 3 percent of the world’s population—3 to 4 million people in the United States alone. Some people with acute hepatitis C infection will be cured without any treatment, but when hepatitis C becomes chronic it may cause cirrhosis, liver cancer, and death. World-renowned gastroenterologist and liver specialist Dr. Paul J. Thuluvath provides detailed information about the disease and its diagnosis and management, including dramatically improved treatments that have recently emerged.

“Superior to similar guides. Incredibly thorough and well-written, the book provides novel information for patients and providers alike.”—Sammy Saab, MD, MPH, AGAF, Pfleger Liver Institute

Available in October

 

 

 

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